exactable:

seriously though, how cool would it be to have that one best friend that’s like your other half and you can literally talk about everything and they’ll completely understand you and not judge you.

(via shouldnt)

boburnahms:

some-sort-of-croatoan-infect:

inlove-fallen-angel:

soaked-fallen-angel:

taco-marco:

staff:

starting today all blogs without the following images will be deleted within 24 hours

image

i’m not even afraid of deletion. i just want this image on my blog

staff why

Staff stop it please

I’VE REBLOGGED THIS LIKE TWICE TODAY AND AT LEAST TWICE YESTERDAY AND IT’S LITERALLY BEEN DIFFERENT EVERY TIME SOMEONE HELP ME PLEASE

hahahahahah oh my god help me

im just reblogging to reblog

(Source: dddderrnsuree, via ssjlink2464)

"Should parents read their daughter's texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

youbestnotmiss:

katthekonqueror:

etherealzephyr:

daeranilen:

daeranilen:

daeranilen:

Earlier today, I served as the “young woman’s voice” in a panel of local experts at a Girl Scouts speaking event. One question for the panel was something to the effect of, "Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

I was surprised when the first panelist answered the question as if it were about cyberbullying. The adult audience nodded sagely as she spoke about the importance of protecting children online.

I reached for the microphone next. I said, “As far as reading your child’s texts or logging into their social media profiles, I would say 99.9% of the time, do not do that.”

Looks of total shock answered me. I actually saw heads jerk back in surprise. Even some of my fellow panelists blinked.

Everyone stared as I explained that going behind a child’s back in such a way severs the bond of trust with the parent. When I said, “This is the most effective way to ensure that your child never tells you anything,” it was like I’d delivered a revelation.

It’s easy to talk about the disconnect between the old and the young, but I don’t think I’d ever been so slapped in the face by the reality of it. It was clear that for most of the parents I spoke to, the idea of such actions as a violation had never occurred to them at all.

It alarms me how quickly adults forget that children are people.

Apparently people are rediscovering this post somehow and I think that’s pretty cool! Having experienced similar violations of trust in my youth, this is an important issue to me, so I want to add my personal story:

Around age 13, I tried to express to my mother that I thought I might have clinical depression, and she snapped at me “not to joke about things like that.” I stopped telling my mother when I felt depressed.

Around age 15, I caught my mother reading my diary. She confessed that any time she saw me write in my diary, she would sneak into my room and read it, because I only wrote when I was upset. I stopped keeping a diary.

Around age 18, I had an emotional breakdown while on vacation because I didn’t want to go to college. I ended up seeing a therapist for - surprise surprise - depression.

Around age 21, I spoke on this panel with my mother in the audience, and afterwards I mentioned the diary incident to her with respect to this particular Q&A. Her eyes welled up, and she said, “You know I read those because I was worried you were depressed and going to hurt yourself, right?”

TL;DR: When you invade your child’s privacy, you communicate three things:

  1. You do not respect their rights as an individual.
  2. You do not trust them to navigate problems or seek help on their own.
  3. You probably haven’t been listening to them.

Information about almost every issue that you think you have to snoop for can probably be obtained by communicating with and listening to your child.

Part of me is really excited to see that the original post got 200 notes because holy crap 200 notes, and part of me is really saddened that something so negative has resonated with so many people.

"I tried to express to my mother that I thought I might have clinical depression, and she snapped at me "

“’You know I read those because I was worried you were depressed and going to hurt yourself, right?’”

I found these quotes particularly interesting. OP’s mother refused to listen when she tried to talk about her depression, but snooped through her things to see if she was depressed.

It’s amazing to me that parents need to be told something that I GUARANTEE they experienced themselves. This is something that predates text messaging. You search your child’s room for drugs, and they will find a better hiding place for anything they may be worried about you finding - even if it’s as innocuous as candy. You try to snoop on their phone conversations with their boyfriend, and they will 1) Find a different way to communicate with him, and 2) Never communicate with YOU about their boyfriend.

My parents doing this shit to me didn’t make me stop doing it and didn’t make me respect them any more. All it did was make me better at sneaking around.

(via ssjlink2464)

Domestic starter sentences/a little fluffy - put one in my askbox for my muse’s reaction

roleplayaskmemes:

  • "Can’t we just stay home today?"
  • "It’s 2 in the afternoon, we should really stop cuddling and get out of bed."
  • "Don’t answer it — it’s probably your boss and you’re mine today."
  • "You’re so cute when you’re sleepy."
  • "Welcome home, I made you dinner!"
  • "I accidentally brought a kitten home."
  • "Get your spoon out the bowl! There’ll be no cake mix left to make actual cakes with!"
  • "Let’s both take a day off on Wednesday and have a day out."

(via m-and-destruction-squared)